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Special ships, special cargoes

Special ships, special cargoes
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Special ships, special cargoes

The principal that an owner who can offer to carry a particular cargo more economically, more safely or more quickly can often win the business has seen a wide variety of specialised ships developed in recent years.  The disadvantage of building a specialised vessel is that it is difficult or impossible to redeploy it if the trade fails for any reason.  The wise owner will usually ask for a long-term contract before investing in such a vessel.

Examples include wood chip carriers, which have very deep holds for this light cargo, and devices to blow it out of the holds when discharging.  Even more specialised are nuclear fuel carriers, which are designed to safely carry small amounts of spent uranium and plutonium in lead-lined containers.  Tankers carrying chemicals are quite commonplace, but a few ships have been built or modified to carry orange juice from Brazil to Northern Europe.  

Special ships, special cargoes
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