Portcities Southampton
UK * Bristol * Hartlepool * Liverpool * London * Southampton
*
You are here: PortCities Southampton > Diversity of Ships > What drives the ship? > What drives the ship?
* Text only * About this site * Site Map * Feedback
*
*
*
Explore this site
Start Here
About Us
Partners And Collections
Timeline
Get Interactive!
Help
Galleries
Image galleries
Biographies
Southampton
The Docks
River Itchen
Southampton at war
Flying Boats
Titanic
Finding Out More
Southampton speaks
Street Directories
Historic Buildings Survey
Registers and Records
Lloyd's Register
Official Sources
Other Records
Finding Out More
Wrecks and Accidents
Why accidents happen
Investigations
Improving Safety at Sea
Finding Out More
Wreck Reports
Life of a Port
How a port comes to life
At work in a port
Ports at play
Trade - lifeblood of a port
Finding Out More
On the Line
Company growth and development
Shipping lines
Transatlantic travel
Preparing a liner
Finding Out More
Sea People
Life at sea
Jobs at sea
Travelling by sea
Starting a new life by sea
Women and the sea
Finding Out More
Diversity of Ships
The variety of ships
What drives the ship?
Ships of ancient times
Ships in the age of sail
Ships of the steam age
Ships of today

What drives the ship?

The evolution in propulsion, from paddles, oars and wind to steam and most recently diesel, has seen many inventions and innovations.  Discover the different ways of driving ships, how they evolved and, in some cases, died out.
---
---
---
Muscle power

When the first boat builders wanted to propel their boats against the flow of a river or the tide, they had only muscle power. Explore their options, and how muscle power especially in the form of oars survived remarkably late.
 man rowing
---
---
---
Sailing ships  Harnessing the wind

The invention of masts and sails may quickly have followed the development of the boat. Discover the evidence for the first use of sails, explore how they work, and which rigs are best in which circumstances.
---
---
---
The coming of steam

The steam engine freed the ship from dependence on wind. However, it took at least a century before the steam ship finally triumphed over the sailing ship. Find out why it took so long, and some of the problems that had to be solved.
 'Dania' steamship
---
---
---
Turbine Steamers Ltd 'King George V'  The turbine

Just when it seemed that steam had reached the limit of its development, along came an inventor who found a way to extract even more power. Read about how Charles Parson’s invention meant ships could steam faster than ever.
---
---
---
The oil engine

The steam engine would always have limitations. Discover how the internal combustion engine drove the competition away and became the main way of propelling ships.
 'Cassiopeia' engine room
*
Search

Advanced Search
*
*
*
Southampton City Council New Opportunities Fund Lloyd's Register London Metropolitan Archives National Maritime Museum World Ship Society  
Legal & Copyright * Partner sites: Bristol * Hartlepool * Liverpool * London * Southampton * Text only * About this site * Feedback