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Wreck Report for 'Jane Pardew', 1885

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Unique ID:14976
Description:Board of Trade Wreck Report for 'Jane Pardew', 1885
Creator:Board of Trade
Date:1885
Copyright:Out of copyright
Partner:SCC Libraries
Partner ID:Unknown

Transcription

(No. 2449.)

"JANE PARDEW."

The Merchant Shipping Acts, 1854 to 1876.

IN the matter of a formal Investigation held at the Town Hall, North Shields, on the 30th day of January 1885, before R. M. TATE and H. E. P. ADAMSON, Esquires, assisted by Captains FRENCH and MURDOCH, into the circumstances attending the stranding of the barque "JANE PARDEW," 14 miles south of Cape Spartel, on the 4th of January 1885.

Report of Court.

The Court, having carefully inquired into the circumstances attending the above-mentioned shipping casualty, finds, for the reasons stated in the annex hereto, that the stranding of the "Jane Pardew" was caused by the master neglecting the use of the lead, and failing to verify his position on the chart by the bearing of Cape Spartel Light, and the Court finds the master, Andrew Ireland Graham, alone in default, and suspends his certificate, No. 18,376, for three calendar months from the date hereof.

Dated this 31st day of January 1885.

 

(Signed)

ROBERT M. TATE,

HENRY E. P. ADAMSON,

Justices.

We concur in the above report.

 

(Signed)

A. P. FRENCH,

ALEX. MURDOCH,

Assessors.

Annex to the Report.

This is an investigation into the circumstances attending the stranding of the barque "Jane Pardew," of South Shields, 14 miles to the southward of Cape Spartel on the 4th of January 1885, held at the Town Hall, North Shields, before R. M. Tate and H. E. P. ADAMSON, Esquires, two of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace, assisted by Captains French and Murdoch (Nautical Assessors). Mr. E. B. Gee appeared on behalf of the Board of Trade, Mr. W. Oxley Foster represented the owner, and the master appeared in person. The "Jane Pardew," official number 18,868, was a British sailing barque, built of wood at Sunderland in 1857, of 405.75 gross and 391.22 registered tonnage. She was owned by Mr. W. Minto, of 4, William Street West, North Shields, he being appointed managing owner on the 14th of June 1881. From the evidence adduced it appears that the "Jane Pardew" was bought by the last owner in July 1881, and she was overhauled in 1882, caulked, coppered, and new sparred, and a portion of the rigging renewed in 1883. In December 1884 she was again thoroughly overhauled in Moralers Dock, South Shields, and on leaving the Tyne on her last voyage she was in good and seaworthy condition, classed A 1 in American Lloyd's. The "Jane Pardew" left the Tyne on the 20th of December 1884, having a cargo of 607 tons of coal, with a crew of 10 hands all told, under the command of Andrew Ireland Graham, who holds a certificate of competency, No. 18,376, bound to Oran, the vessel drawing 16 feet 10 inches forward, and 17 feet 4 inches aft. She arrived off Cape Trafalgar on the 4th of January 1885 about 1.45 p.m.; Cape Trafalgar bore E.N.E., distance 10 to 11 miles by cross bearings taken from the high land behind Tarifa, and the land towards Cadiz, close hauled under all plain sail except top-gallantsails and mainsail. The vessel was then put about, and stood to the southward. At 4 p.m. Cape Spartel Lighthouse bore E. by S., distant 8 to 9 miles, and at 6.15 p.m. that light bore N.E. 3/4 E., and the ship still continued standing to the southward. A little after 6 p.m. the master went below, leaving the chief mate in charge, leaving instructions for the ship to be put about when Cape Spartel bore N.E., but this was positively denied by the chief officer, who said that the only instructions left by the master was that the ship had to be put about a little before 8 p.m., when all hands would be on deck. At 6.45 p.m. the master was in the cabin, and the mate went and told him that he thought that they were drawing too close in to the land, and the master went on deck and immediately ordered the helm hard up and the spanker to be hauled in to wear ship, but she struck the ground after going one point off. The yards were backed, and her stern slewed to the westward, and the sea commenced to break heavily over her. The lifeboat and the jolly-boat were put over the side. The jolly-boat got adrift, with one man in her. All hands tumbled into the lifeboat, the master being one of the first to get into the lifeboat. The man in the jolly-boat was taken out, when they returned, and hung on to the ship until morning, and after boarding the vessel and obtaining clothing, provisions, and the chronometer and official log, at 6.30 a.m. of the 5th they started for Cape Spartel, on reaching which they found they could not land. They then attempted to get into Tangiers, but were prevented by a strong easterly wind. Fortunately, on the afternoon of the 5th, they fell in with an Austrian barque, who assisted them into Gibraltar, where they landed at 10 p.m. of the 6th. When the vessel was abandoned her back was broken, and she had become a total wreck. This disaster appears to have arisen from the fact of the master having entirely neglected to watch the bearings of Cape Spartel Lighthouse, and from totally neglecting to use the lead at a time when he was gradually shallowing his water and nearing the land; and the Court considered that the master was guilty of great negligence in having left the deck shortly after six o'clock, his presence at that time being urgently required.

At the conclusion of the evidence, the following questions were submitted to the Court on behalf of the Board of Trade:-

1. What was the cause of the stranding of the sailing ship "Jane Pardew," on the Coast of Morocco, on the 4th January, 1885?

2. Whether the compasses were in good working order and properly placed, and whether the master ascertained their deviation by observation from time to time and applied the proper corrections to the courses?

3. Whether a safe and proper course was set and steered from Cape Trafalgar, and whether due allowance was made for tide, currents and leeway?

4. Whether proper measures were taken to ascertain and verify the position of the vessel when off Cape Trafalgar and also afterwards until the vessel stranded?

5. Whether a good and proper look-out was kept?

6. Whether the master and mate were respectively justified in totally neglecting the use of the lead?

7. Whether the vessel was navigated with proper and seamanlike care?

In the opinion of the Board of Trade the certificates of the master and mate should be dealt with.

Dated this 30th day of January 1885.

 

EDWARD B. GEE,

For the Board of Trade.

Judgment.

1. The stranding of the "Jane Pardew" was caused by the master neglecting the use of the lead and failing to verify his position on the chart by the bearing of Cape Spartel Light.

2. The compasses were in good order, properly placed, and the master said their errors had been ascertained.

3. The ship was close hauled by the wind, and the master stated that he had made allowance for current but admitted that it was insufficient.

4. When off Cape Trafalgar the master verified the ship's position by cross bearings, but after passing Cape Spartel he neglected his bearings at a critical moment when they were of the greatest importance.

5. There is no fault to find with the look-out.

6. The neglect of the lead was not justifiable.

7. The vessel was not navigated with proper and seamanlike care.

The Court finds the master, Andrew Ireland Graham, alone in default, and suspends his certificate, No. 18,376, for three calendar months from the date hereof.

 

(Signed)

ROBERT M. TATE,

HENRY E. P. ADAMSON,

Justices.

We concur in the above judgment.

 

(Signed)

A. P. FRENCH,

ALEX. MURDOCH,

Assessors.

L 367. 2224. 170.-2/85. Wt. 36. E. & S.

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