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Wreck Report for 'Locksley', 1885

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Unique ID:14994
Description:Board of Trade Wreck Report for 'Locksley', 1885
Creator:Board of Trade
Date:1885
Copyright:Out of copyright
Partner:SCC Libraries
Partner ID:Unknown

Transcription

(No. 2658.)

"LOCKSLEY" (S.S.)

The Merchant Shipping Acts, 1854 to 1876.

IN the matter of a formal Investigation held at the Town Hall, North Shields, on the 26th day of August 1885, before R. M. TATE and J. F. SPENCE, Esquires, assisted by Captains PARISH and BEASLEY, into the circumstances attending the stranding of the steamship "LOCKSLEY," on the 9th of August 1885, on Filly Tail Reef.

Report of Court.

The Court, having carefully inquired into the circumstances attending the above-mentioned shipping casualty, finds, for the reasons stated in the annex hereto, that the stranding of the steamship "Locksley" was caused by the vessel being kept too close in shore, the master through over-confidence not using the lead, and the Court finds the master in default, and, whilst not dealing with his certificate, cautions him to use greater care in future.

Dated this 27th day of August 1885.

 

(Signed)

ROBERT M. TATE,

Justices.

 

 

JOHN FOSTER SPENCE,

 

We concur in the above report.

 

(Signed)

ALFRED PARISH,

Assessors.

 

 

THOS. BEASLEY,

 

Annex to the Report.

This is an investigation held at the Town Hall, North Shields, into the circumstances attending the stranding of the steamship "Locksley," before Robert M. Tate and John F. Spence, Esquires, two of Her Majesty's Justices of the Peace, assisted by Captains Parish and Beasley (Nautical Assessors). Mr. de Hamel appeared on behalf of the Board of Trade and Mr. W. Oxley Forster represented the master and owners. The "Locksley," official No. 88,775, is an iron screw steamer, built at Wallsend, on the River Tyne, in 1884, by the Wallsend Slipway and Engineering Company, Limited, of the following dimensions, length, 91 feet, breadth, 20 feet 2 inches, and depth of hold, 8 feet, and of 121.01 gross, and 74.28 registered tonnage. She is fitted with one pair of compound surface condensing engines of 20 horses power (combined), and is owned by Robert Mason, of 141, Portland Road, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and several others, Mr. Mason being appointed the managing owner on the 29th of May 1884. The "Locksley" left Lynn on the 8th of August 1885 at 3 p.m., with a cargo of 150 tons of wheat, having a crew of 5 hands all told, under the command of Thomas Morris, who holds a certificate of competency No. 83,462, bound to Newcastle-on-Tyne. There were also four passengers, the family of the master, on board, the vessel drawing 7 feet forward, and 9 feet aft. At 9.30 a.m. of the 9th of August Flamborough Head bore W.N.W., distant two miles, wind S.W. blowing a moderate gale, vessel going full speed making about 7 knots, the course being N.N.W. At 3 p.m. she passed the Whitby Rock Buoy at a distance of about 300 yards to the eastward; the master then went to the wheel and steered by the land, hauling close in, as he stated, to get smoother water and to cheat the tide. He also stated that as he had been running up and down that coast for so long he knew it very well. He was in the act of hauling the vessel out to clear Wittleness when she struck the ground about 3.45 p.m. on a reef called the Filly Tail Reef, about three quarters of a mile to the southward of the ness, and about half a mile off shore. The engines were reversed, but the vessel remained fast, making no water until the next tide, when she became holed under the starboard bunker, and made a good deal of water. After remaining ashore three days she was got off and brought to the Tyne, where she was repaired, and is now engaged in the coasting trade. The master appears to have trusted too much to his presumeable knowledge of the coast, and thus did not take all the precautions that he should have done to avoid the casualty.

At the conclusion of the evidence the following questions were submitted to the Court.-

1. What was the cause of the stranding of the "Locksley" on the Filly Tail Reef, off Whitby, on the 9th August 1885?

2. Whether the master was justified in keeping his vessel so close in shore after passing Whitby Rock Buoy?

3. Whether the neglect of the lead was justifiable?

4. Whether the vessel was navigated with proper and seamanlike care?

In the opinion of the Board of Trade the certificate of the master should be dealt with.

Dated this 26th August 1885.

LANCEL DE HAMEL,

For the Board of Trade.

Judgment.

1. The stranding of the S.S. "Locksley" was caused by the vessel being kept too close in shore, the master, through over confidence, not using the lead.

2. The master kept his vessel too close in shore, but stated that he did so in order to cheat the tide and get into smooth water.

3. Keeping so close in shore the master should have used the lead and kept outside the 5 fathom line.

4. Referring to the above answers the Court cannot say that the vessel was navigated with all care.

The Court finds the master in default, and whilst not dealing with his certificate, cautions him to use greater care in future.

 

(Signed)

ROBERT M. TATE,

Justices.

 

 

JOHN FOSTER SPENCE,

 

We concur in the above judgment.

 

(Signed)

ALFRED PARISH,

Assessors.

 

 

THOS. BEASLEY,

 

L 367. 2435. 180.-9/85. Wt. 408. E. & S.

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